• 29Jan

    3D is making a comeback.  You’ve seen it in movies and heard about it for television.  This March, Nintendo will even introduce a 3D handheld gaming device.  Nintendo will be recommending that children under 6 should not use the device in 3D mode. Why?

    If you have trouble perceiving 3D images tell your eye doctor.

    If you have trouble perceiving 3D images tell your eye doctor.

    Allaboutvision.com thinks the company is likely being cautious because of a lack of research on the effects of long-term 3D viewing on young children’s vision development.  This may be a wise precautionary choice for parents, however the American Optometric Association (AOA) recently released a statement saying it is safe if the child’s visual system is developing normally.  The AOA went on to suggest 3D viewing of movies, TV and the Nintendo 3DS may actually help diagnose subtle vision disorders, like convergence insufficiency, that should be corrected. 

    Some people have difficulty aligning their eyes to focus properly, or converging.  It is a vision disorder that often goes undetected.  Interestingly, this insufficiency can be especially noticeable during a 3D viewing experience.  If you or your child has difficulty perceiving the 3D effect, experiences discomfort, or gets dizzy, you should tell Dr. Olson.  An AOA survey suggests that as much as 25% of the population may have difficulty with 3D content, experiencing what is now being called “3D Vision Syndrome.”  Treatment is available, so don’t hesitate to call and schedule an eye health & vision exam.

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  • 22Jan
    Optic nerve damage caused by glaucoma affects the visual field

    Optic nerve damage caused by glaucoma affects the visual field

    Anyone can develop sight-threatening glaucoma.  It’s the second leading cause of blindness in the world, according to the World Health Organization. But an eye doctor can detect it before significant vision loss begins.  Glaucoma occurs when pressure inside the eye slowly rises, and this leads to optic nerve damage and vision loss.  During every eye health exam we measure ocular pressure and use advanced visual fields technology to detect glaucoma as early as possible.  Early glaucoma detection is one of many reasons why routine eye exams are so important, even when you’re seeing clearly.

    Anyone can develop glaucoma, but some people are more at risk than others:  African Americans over age 40;  Everyone over age 60, especially Mexican Americans;  People with a family history of glaucoma; People who are severely near-sighted; Anyone with diabetes.  For these people, it is especially important to have an exam at least once a year.

    Anyone can develop glaucoma, but there are things we can do to minimize the risk of vision loss. 

    • Follow recommendations for a healthy lifestyle to prevent obesity & diabetes, which can increase the risk of glaucoma.  Exercise.  Eat lots of fresh fruits and veggies, specifically leafy greens and foods high in antioxidants.  Avoid smoking and excessive alcohol. 
    • If you are prescribed eye drops for treatment of glaucoma, follow the prescribed regimen diligently.  Non-compliance is a major reason glaucoma leads to blindness.  
    • Early detection during an eye health exam is the best way to control the disease often called “the sneak thief of sight”.  That’s why, based on your individual health and risk factors, Dr. Olson prescribes how often you should be examined.  

    Anyone can develop glaucoma, but we want to help you detect it early and prevent vision loss.  Prevent Blindness American estimates that over 4 million Americans have glaucoma, but only half of those know that they have it.   If you haven’t had a comprehensive eye health exam in the last year, call us today at 319.385.9534 to schedule an appointment.

    Visit AllAboutVision.com to learn about eye diseases, including forms of macular degeneration, causes of glaucoma, and signs of a cataract.

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